Reflecting on Assessment AS Learning

Assessment AS Learning ( Growing Success, 2010)

The process of developing and supporting student metacognition.  Students are actively engaged in this assessment process:  that is, they monitor their own learning, use assessment feedback from teacher, self, and peers to determine next steps; and set individual learning goals.

Reflect on what you have heard today around the Teacher-Student relationship.   How will you support students to become self-directed assessors of their own learning?

About Kelly-Ann Power

Windsor-Essex Catholic District School Board Vice-Principal View all posts by Kelly-Ann Power

19 responses to “Reflecting on Assessment AS Learning

  • K

    Provide the students with positive feedback, and encourage them to set goals and work hard to achieve them.

  • Joshua Laurin

    When you assign a writing assignment, you can get students to become self assessors by getting them to revise and edit each others work.

  • dana price

    We need to model and display the classroom expectations for assessment anf get students to actively engage in metacognition.

  • Brenden Quinn

    By laying out curriculum expectations before activities or lessons so that the students know what is expected of them. If the students know the goal it is a lot easier for them to get there, if they are unsure it causes a lot of confusion.

  • J'amy

    Ask THEM for their input of how THEY think they should be assessed. A potential collaborative rubric could be consrtucted as well.

  • Winnie Leung

    – Guide them – be a lead learner
    – Provide support and gradually release
    – Positive reinforcement (“Good job!”)

  • Jason

    Use “Bump It Up” wall to display student work and to encourage students to always strive for their own personal best.

  • Heather

    I will support students to become self-directed assessors of their own learning: giving them choice in the type of product they will create so that they have ownership over what they are creating and can use their preferential type of learning.

  • Ashley

    By teaching students the necessary skills to become self directed of their own learning

  • Jessica Vanier

    It reminds me of parenting – we are constantly trying to move our children towards independence. We assess where are at, where they need to be or get to, and how to accomplih that.

  • Tecla

    I will support and encourage students becoming self-directed assessors of their own learning by modelling self-directed assessment for them.

  • Anonymous

    Model the behaviour, and encourage any/all independent thoughts and opinions.

  • Br. Oss

    scaffolding and modelling, it’s a slow process. Make a goal of making independent students for the end of the year and do not expect it to come easily or very soon.

  • Jessica Vanier

    It reminds me of parenting – we are constantly trying to move our children towards independence. We assess where are at, where they need to be or get to, and how to accomplih that.

    thank you

  • Colin Pattison

    Have students decide on the media that they feel most comfortable with in terms of setting themselves up to succeed.

  • Jennifer

    It is important that if you set the expectations for your students to be self-directed assessors, you need to teach them the skills to do so! You can never assume your students know how to do what you are expecting them to do by teaching and modelling.

  • D

    With your students, develop a success criteria.

  • Julian Carere

    To help the students become independent learners I will use and follow this guide of the gradual release of responsibility. However, I must put a lot of emphasis on the learning part of it. My logic behind that is that if I expect students to work properly and independently I must be as accurate and minimize the errors in the way I model whether it is through my mannerisms, style of speech, pronunciation and even questions I answer to begin. When I am answering questions I must set time aside to go step by step.

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